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ALLERGY-ARTHRITIS CONNECTION: CLINICAL ECOLOGISTS DETERMINING CAUSES

Some cases of arthritis and some cases of non-arthritic ecologic diseases (affecting other parts and systems of the body) are so complicated that they positively require the expertise of a well-trained, ecologically oriented physician. A regular allergist – even a board-certified specialist – does not have the knowledge and skill to help you.
Traditionally trained allergists have never been exposed to, or have not taken the opportunity to become familiar with, the currently available information concerning the often easy to demonstrate causes of environmentally produced arthritis. Few medical schools teach anything at all about ecologic science (the clinical application of ecologic principles), and there is not very much instruction about allergy, preventive medicine, or clinical nutrition given to our future doctors.
It is understandable how many fine, sincere physicians are not nearly as effective as they could be despite their intellectual capacity and desire to help their patients. Their diagnostic and therapeutic horizons are greatly limited by these generally unrecognized deficiencies in their training.
The Arthritis Foundation, which is a major source of information for interested physicians and the public, has flatly rejected the idea that arthritis could be an allergic disorder of the joints and muscles. The foundation does not or will not believe that arthritis might be associated with, or caused by reactions to or a lack of, certain substances in the diet. The foundation does believe that an allergy-like immunologic reaction caused by factors unknown to them may be responsible for arthritis, but they continue to ignore the dietary and environmental factors that ecologists have clearly shown in thousands of instances are capable of setting off attacks of arthritis. This is a very puzzling inconsistency.
Be that as it may, you can judge the facts for yourself and make up your own mind.
Every disease must have a cause. A good way of determining that our testing for the causes of arthritis by provocative techniques is accurate and clinically effective is to see if application of this information leads to a treatment that cures or significantly relieves an active case or prevents its recurrence. That is exactly what clinical ecologists have done for many years in case after case and study after study with thousands of patients. We do not claim to be able to cure the bone damage associated with arthritis if the allergy-initiated inflammation and structural changes are allowed to continue too long, but we can give considerable relief to many. Together, the arthritic and the ecologist often cure arthritis by continuous attention to the demonstrable causes in each case, while the condition remains in its reversible state. Careful avoidance of test-identified food offenders in conjunction with a rotary-diversified diet, desensitization treatment (immunotherapy), and changes in life-style, along with nutritional supplements, can prevent the occurrence of future “spontaneous” flare-ups due to exposure to previously unsuspected dietary and environmental factors.
*15/295/5*

ALLERGY-ARTHRITIS CONNECTION: CLINICAL ECOLOGISTS DETERMINING CAUSES Some cases of arthritis and some cases of non-arthritic ecologic diseases (affecting other parts and systems of the body) are so complicated that they positively require the expertise of a well-trained, ecologically oriented physician. A regular allergist – even a board-certified specialist – does not have the knowledge and skill to help you.Traditionally trained allergists have never been exposed to, or have not taken the opportunity to become familiar with, the currently available information concerning the often easy to demonstrate causes of environmentally produced arthritis. Few medical schools teach anything at all about ecologic science (the clinical application of ecologic principles), and there is not very much instruction about allergy, preventive medicine, or clinical nutrition given to our future doctors.It is understandable how many fine, sincere physicians are not nearly as effective as they could be despite their intellectual capacity and desire to help their patients. Their diagnostic and therapeutic horizons are greatly limited by these generally unrecognized deficiencies in their training.The Arthritis Foundation, which is a major source of information for interested physicians and the public, has flatly rejected the idea that arthritis could be an allergic disorder of the joints and muscles. The foundation does not or will not believe that arthritis might be associated with, or caused by reactions to or a lack of, certain substances in the diet. The foundation does believe that an allergy-like immunologic reaction caused by factors unknown to them may be responsible for arthritis, but they continue to ignore the dietary and environmental factors that ecologists have clearly shown in thousands of instances are capable of setting off attacks of arthritis. This is a very puzzling inconsistency.Be that as it may, you can judge the facts for yourself and make up your own mind.Every disease must have a cause. A good way of determining that our testing for the causes of arthritis by provocative techniques is accurate and clinically effective is to see if application of this information leads to a treatment that cures or significantly relieves an active case or prevents its recurrence. That is exactly what clinical ecologists have done for many years in case after case and study after study with thousands of patients. We do not claim to be able to cure the bone damage associated with arthritis if the allergy-initiated inflammation and structural changes are allowed to continue too long, but we can give considerable relief to many. Together, the arthritic and the ecologist often cure arthritis by continuous attention to the demonstrable causes in each case, while the condition remains in its reversible state. Careful avoidance of test-identified food offenders in conjunction with a rotary-diversified diet, desensitization treatment (immunotherapy), and changes in life-style, along with nutritional supplements, can prevent the occurrence of future “spontaneous” flare-ups due to exposure to previously unsuspected dietary and environmental factors.*15/295/5*

COMBATTING ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS – STEROIDS: THE CORTISONE DRUGS – SIDE EFFECTS OF STEROID TREATMENT

The side effects which may arise with steroid treatment depend on the level of the dose and the duration for which it is taken. Major side effects take months to develop. Steroid treatment for a few days, or a few weeks, is safe and rarely causes problems. However, if steroids are used regularly several times a day, the chances of developing side effects increase. Many of the unacceptable side effects of cortisone can be avoided by giving the drug once a day in the morning, or on alternate days. Alternate-day steroid therapy has become a well-accepted method for treating asthma which does not respond to the conventional drugs. It has allowed many severe asthmatics to stay out of hospital and lead a relatively normal life. Prednisone or prednisolone is the cortisone drug of choice in alternate day therapy. However, sometimes children may develop the following fairly serious side effects after long-term use of oral steroids in higher doses.
1. Changes in shape of the body. Steroids often stimulate appetite, therefore weight gain is a common side effect. Steroids can also change the normal distribution of body fat, shifting it to the face and trunk, so that a round-faced, round-bodied look develops. This effect can be reversed when the drug is reduced or stopped.
2. Reduced growth rate. Prolonged use of steroids can interfere with the growth rate of the long bones of the body and this can affect the growth of a child. However, even after long periods of suppression by steroids, growth usually resumes when steroids are reduced or stopped.
3. Adrenal suppression. The adrenal glands are the body’s natural source of Cortisol. When cortisol-like drugs are given for extended periods of time, the adrenals may become ‘lazy’ and stop their own production of Cortisol. If the drug is discontinued abruptly after a long period of time, it takes time for the adrenals to begin to function again. During this interim period, the natural supply of corticosteroids is very low. This problem can be avoided by taking gradually decreasing doses. This gives the adrenal glands time to renew their production of Cortisol.
*61\260\8*

COMBATTING ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS – STEROIDS: THE CORTISONE DRUGS – SIDE EFFECTS OF STEROID TREATMENTThe side effects which may arise with steroid treatment depend on the level of the dose and the duration for which it is taken. Major side effects take months to develop. Steroid treatment for a few days, or a few weeks, is safe and rarely causes problems. However, if steroids are used regularly several times a day, the chances of developing side effects increase. Many of the unacceptable side effects of cortisone can be avoided by giving the drug once a day in the morning, or on alternate days. Alternate-day steroid therapy has become a well-accepted method for treating asthma which does not respond to the conventional drugs. It has allowed many severe asthmatics to stay out of hospital and lead a relatively normal life. Prednisone or prednisolone is the cortisone drug of choice in alternate day therapy. However, sometimes children may develop the following fairly serious side effects after long-term use of oral steroids in higher doses.1. Changes in shape of the body. Steroids often stimulate appetite, therefore weight gain is a common side effect. Steroids can also change the normal distribution of body fat, shifting it to the face and trunk, so that a round-faced, round-bodied look develops. This effect can be reversed when the drug is reduced or stopped.2. Reduced growth rate. Prolonged use of steroids can interfere with the growth rate of the long bones of the body and this can affect the growth of a child. However, even after long periods of suppression by steroids, growth usually resumes when steroids are reduced or stopped.3. Adrenal suppression. The adrenal glands are the body’s natural source of Cortisol. When cortisol-like drugs are given for extended periods of time, the adrenals may become ‘lazy’ and stop their own production of Cortisol. If the drug is discontinued abruptly after a long period of time, it takes time for the adrenals to begin to function again. During this interim period, the natural supply of corticosteroids is very low. This problem can be avoided by taking gradually decreasing doses. This gives the adrenal glands time to renew their production of Cortisol.*61\260\8*

KEY POINTS: NEPHROPATHY

Nephropathy has traditionally occurred in 30-40% of people with type 1 diabetes.
Mortality from complications of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes was 80% in 1971, 40% in 1984, and 20% in 1996. With modern intensive management of glucose, blood pressure, albuminuria, and the synthesis and/or action of angiotensin II, the incidence of nephropathy and its cardiovascular complications will continue to decrease.
Intensive glucose management, with a HbAlc goal of < 7%, will decrease occurrence of microalbuminuria and subsequent diabetic nephropathy.
If microalbuminuria (> 30 mg/24 hr) is present, therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors leads to regression of microalbuminuria and delays the progression to clinical albuminuria (> 300 mg/24 hr) and/or end-stage renal failure. These effects are seen in normotensive as well as hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients vvith microalbuminuria.
ACE inhibitor therapy in type 1 diabetic patients with clinical albuminuria and an elevated serum creatinine leads to a 48-50% reduction in the risk of doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end-stage renal disease
*66\357\8*

KEY POINTS: NEPHROPATHYNephropathy has traditionally occurred in 30-40% of people with type 1 diabetes.Mortality from complications of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes was 80% in 1971, 40% in 1984, and 20% in 1996. With modern intensive management of glucose, blood pressure, albuminuria, and the synthesis and/or action of angiotensin II, the incidence of nephropathy and its cardiovascular complications will continue to decrease.  Intensive glucose management, with a HbAlc goal of < 7%, will decrease occurrence of microalbuminuria and subsequent diabetic nephropathy.If microalbuminuria (> 30 mg/24 hr) is present, therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors leads to regression of microalbuminuria and delays the progression to clinical albuminuria (> 300 mg/24 hr) and/or end-stage renal failure. These effects are seen in normotensive as well as hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients vvith microalbuminuria.ACE inhibitor therapy in type 1 diabetic patients with clinical albuminuria and an elevated serum creatinine leads to a 48-50% reduction in the risk of doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end-stage renal disease*66\357\8*

DISPARITY IN CVD (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE) RISKS

Cardiovascular disease is not an “equal opportunity” disease. In fact, when it comes to risk of attack and eventual mortality, there are huge disparities based on gender, race, and age. Consider the following:
- Higher CVD risks exist among black and Mexican American women than among white women of comparable socioeconomic status (SES). The striking differences by both ethnicity and SES underscore the critical need to improve screening, early detection, and treatment of CVD-related conditions for black and Mexican American women, as well as for women of lower SES in all ethnic groups.
- Among American Indians/Alaskan Natives age 18 and older, 63.7 percent of men and 61.4 percent of women have one or more CVD risk factors (hypertension, current cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, obesity, or diabetes). If data on physical activity had been included in this analysis, the prevalence of risk factors would have been much higher.
- In 1999, CHD death rates were 225.4 for white males and 216.4 for black males (7% higher) at all ages and stages of life.
- In 1999, CHD death rates for white females were 135.0 for white females and 154.7 for black females.
- Blacks are 60 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than are whites, and are two and a half times more likely to die of a stroke than are whites.
- A family history of diabetes, gout, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol increases one’s risk of heart disease. Blacks have an increased risk of these familial risk factors, increasing their overall risk for CVD.
*17/277/5*

DISPARITY IN CVD (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE) RISKSCardiovascular disease is not an “equal opportunity” disease. In fact, when it comes to risk of attack and eventual mortality, there are huge disparities based on gender, race, and age. Consider the following:- Higher CVD risks exist among black and Mexican American women than among white women of comparable socioeconomic status (SES). The striking differences by both ethnicity and SES underscore the critical need to improve screening, early detection, and treatment of CVD-related conditions for black and Mexican American women, as well as for women of lower SES in all ethnic groups.- Among American Indians/Alaskan Natives age 18 and older, 63.7 percent of men and 61.4 percent of women have one or more CVD risk factors (hypertension, current cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, obesity, or diabetes). If data on physical activity had been included in this analysis, the prevalence of risk factors would have been much higher.- In 1999, CHD death rates were 225.4 for white males and 216.4 for black males (7% higher) at all ages and stages of life.- In 1999, CHD death rates for white females were 135.0 for white females and 154.7 for black females.- Blacks are 60 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than are whites, and are two and a half times more likely to die of a stroke than are whites.- A family history of diabetes, gout, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol increases one’s risk of heart disease. Blacks have an increased risk of these familial risk factors, increasing their overall risk for CVD.*17/277/5*

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER AND COMMONLY USED THERAPIES

There are many kinds of complementary therapies that are used by patients in a variety of ways and at every stage of the treatment process and beyond. Women with gynecological cancers use a wide range of complementary therapies. The more commonly used therapies include:
•     Acupuncture                     •   Prayer
•     Bach flower essences         •   Reiki
•     Chiropractic                     •   Relaxation
•     Dietary change               •   Spiritual healing
•     Exercise                           •   Therapeutic touch
•     Herbal medicine               •   Traditional Chinese medicine
(eastern and western)       •   Visualization
•     Homoeopathy                 •   Massage
•     Hypnotherapy                 •   Vitamin and mineral supplements
•     Naturopathy
In addition to these therapies women with gynecological cancers also use a variety of psychological supports. These include individual psychotherapy, sexual counseling and support groups, including family support.
Many women had a regular additional regime of meditation, visualization, yoga, acupuncture, increased Vitamin В and С (but only to a recommended daily dose not beyond), herbal liver supplements to support the liver, dietary changes.
*99/144/5*

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER AND COMMONLY USED THERAPIESThere are many kinds of complementary therapies that are used by patients in a variety of ways and at every stage of the treatment process and beyond. Women with gynecological cancers use a wide range of complementary therapies. The more commonly used therapies include:•     Acupuncture                     •   Prayer•     Bach flower essences         •   Reiki•     Chiropractic                     •   Relaxation•     Dietary change               •   Spiritual healing•     Exercise                           •   Therapeutic touch•     Herbal medicine               •   Traditional Chinese medicine      (eastern and western)       •   Visualization•     Homoeopathy                 •   Massage•     Hypnotherapy                 •   Vitamin and mineral supplements•     Naturopathy                    In addition to these therapies women with gynecological cancers also use a variety of psychological supports. These include individual psychotherapy, sexual counseling and support groups, including family support.Many women had a regular additional regime of meditation, visualization, yoga, acupuncture, increased Vitamin В and С (but only to a recommended daily dose not beyond), herbal liver supplements to support the liver, dietary changes.*99/144/5*

HOW CONSTIPATION AFFECTS ARTHRITICS: ANALYSE YOUR PROBLEM

Arthritics who suddenly find themselves constipated should analyse the possible cause of their new misfortune. Here’s how. . . .
The purpose of eating is to give cells and tissue their nourishment. This nourishment can only evolve when the food is broken down by digestive juices. The better one chews one’s food, the easier the work for the digestive juices.
Inside our bodies, chemical decomposition breaks down our food into tiny particles. From all this action, priceless vitamins, amino acids, sugar, salt, minerals — and microscopic oil by-products — are released by the small intestine into our bodies, for the purpose of nourishment, repair and storage.
Water in food, or milk or soup, accompanies foods as they pass through the digestive processes. The water adds solubility to the mixture, and makes the digestive task easier. Chewing your foods will permit easier digestion—because foods will then go into solutions of semi-liquids more readily.
We cannot emphasise too strongly or repeat too often this single fact. . . .
Let your foods be broken down and digested completely before you add any oil-free liquids.
*47\146\2*

HOW CONSTIPATION AFFECTS ARTHRITICS: ANALYSE YOUR PROBLEMArthritics who suddenly find themselves constipated should analyse the possible cause of their new misfortune. Here’s how. . . .The purpose of eating is to give cells and tissue their nourishment. This nourishment can only evolve when the food is broken down by digestive juices. The better one chews one’s food, the easier the work for the digestive juices.Inside our bodies, chemical decomposition breaks down our food into tiny particles. From all this action, priceless vitamins, amino acids, sugar, salt, minerals — and microscopic oil by-products — are released by the small intestine into our bodies, for the purpose of nourishment, repair and storage.Water in food, or milk or soup, accompanies foods as they pass through the digestive processes. The water adds solubility to the mixture, and makes the digestive task easier. Chewing your foods will permit easier digestion—because foods will then go into solutions of semi-liquids more readily.We cannot emphasise too strongly or repeat too often this single fact. . . .Let your foods be broken down and digested completely before you add any oil-free liquids.*47\146\2*

DENTAL CARE: GIVING YOUR TEETH A GOOD, LONG LIFE

Prevention. That’s the keyword in dental care — taking care of your teeth now to avoid future problems. Since teeth are living organisms, they are subject to damage from the foods we eat, especially those containing sugar. Bacteria that are not removed from the teeth by brushing or flossing become a sticky, colorless film called plaque. Food particles, especially sugar, stick to plaque and produce acid. This acid damages tooth enamel. When this damage, or decay, spreads down the root canal to the nerve, it causes pain and inflammation. In other words: a toothache.
Another problem caused by an accumulation of plaque is gum disease, or gingivitis. It is an inflammation of the gums that can cause redness, discomfort, swelling, watery discharge and bleeding when you brush or chew. Gingivitis also causes the gums to become deformed, with the crevice between the gums and teeth deepening and forming pockets. In severe cases, this can result in tooth loss.
Prevention
Most dental problems can be prevented by good self-care and regular visits to the dentist. With proper care and injury prevention, we can expect to keep our teeth for life, unlike our parents’ and grandparents’ generations. Here are some ways to keep teeth and gums healthy.
REGULAR CHECKUPS
Have teeth professionally cleaned every six to 12 months, beginning at about age 3. Regular dental checkups can provide early detection of gingivitis, cavities and other problems, making treatment easier.
BRUSHING
Brush teeth thoroughly twice a day, especially after eating when possible. The goal is to remove plaque from all surfaces of the teeth. Children over 3 years old and adults should use a soft-bristle toothbrush with rounded tips, and replace it every three to four months. Use a small amount (pea size) of fluoride toothpaste.
Water piks and electric toothbrushes may help some people clean hard-to-reach areas. Check with your dentist regarding what’s best for you.
The formation of tartar, mineral deposits that get trapped on the teeth by plaque, can be slowed by tartar-control toothpastes.
Be sure to brush the tongue as well as the teeth. Plaque on the tongue can cause bad breath. Also, since you can actually harm your gums by brushing too hard or in the wrong direction, consult your dentist on the best brushing procedures.
FLOSSING
Daily flossing is the best way to prevent gum disease between teeth. The purpose is to scrape off the plaque that forms between the teeth and just under the gum line.
The various types of dental floss (waxed, unwaxed, extra fine, flossing tape and flossing ribbons) each have advantages. Select the type that works best on your teeth.
The most important aspect of flossing is to curve the floss around the tooth being cleaned and slide it under the gum line. With both fingers holding the floss against the tooth, move the floss up and down several times to scrape off the plaque.
Flossing should be started with children as soon as they have teeth that touch each other. A child usually can’t floss their own teeth until around the age of 8. Using a flossing tool can be helpful in doing a good job in a small mouth.
DISCLOSING TABLETS
Disclosing tablets are small, chewable tablets that can be found at most drugstores. Chew the tablet and swish with water. The tablet will color any plaque that remains on the teeth. By using a flashlight and dental mirror, you can see where you’ve been missing the plaque with your regular brushing and flossing routines. This is especially helpful (and fun) for children in reinforcing good dental habits.
FLUORIDE
Fluoride is a mineral found in most food and water supplies that strengthens tooth enamel and lowers the risk of tooth decay. In many areas of the country, fluoride is added to the water because the natural levels of fluoride are too low to protect teeth.
Infants and children in low-fluoride areas can be given fluoride supplements in the form of tablets or drops. Fluoride toothpastes, rinses or topical applications are also beneficial.
SEALANTS
Sealants are a plastic coating usually applied to children’s back teeth. They protect the molars (the larger chewing teeth at the back of the mouth) from developing decay. By using sealants and fluoride, it is possible for children to grow up without cavities.
What you can do
If you have a toothache, taking aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen (Tylenol) may lessen the pain while a dental appointment is being made. NEVER give aspirin to children/teenagers. It can cause Reye’s syndrome, a rare but often fatal condition.
Final notes
Do not put infants or young children to bed with a bottle filled with juice,     sugar water, milk or formula. These liquids pool around teeth and can cause serious tooth decay called bottle mouth.
*68\303\2*

DENTAL CARE: GIVING YOUR TEETH A GOOD, LONG LIFEPrevention. That’s the keyword in dental care — taking care of your teeth now to avoid future problems. Since teeth are living organisms, they are subject to damage from the foods we eat, especially those containing sugar. Bacteria that are not removed from the teeth by brushing or flossing become a sticky, colorless film called plaque. Food particles, especially sugar, stick to plaque and produce acid. This acid damages tooth enamel. When this damage, or decay, spreads down the root canal to the nerve, it causes pain and inflammation. In other words: a toothache.Another problem caused by an accumulation of plaque is gum disease, or gingivitis. It is an inflammation of the gums that can cause redness, discomfort, swelling, watery discharge and bleeding when you brush or chew. Gingivitis also causes the gums to become deformed, with the crevice between the gums and teeth deepening and forming pockets. In severe cases, this can result in tooth loss.
Prevention Most dental problems can be prevented by good self-care and regular visits to the dentist. With proper care and injury prevention, we can expect to keep our teeth for life, unlike our parents’ and grandparents’ generations. Here are some ways to keep teeth and gums healthy.
REGULAR CHECKUPSHave teeth professionally cleaned every six to 12 months, beginning at about age 3. Regular dental checkups can provide early detection of gingivitis, cavities and other problems, making treatment easier.
BRUSHINGBrush teeth thoroughly twice a day, especially after eating when possible. The goal is to remove plaque from all surfaces of the teeth. Children over 3 years old and adults should use a soft-bristle toothbrush with rounded tips, and replace it every three to four months. Use a small amount (pea size) of fluoride toothpaste.Water piks and electric toothbrushes may help some people clean hard-to-reach areas. Check with your dentist regarding what’s best for you.The formation of tartar, mineral deposits that get trapped on the teeth by plaque, can be slowed by tartar-control toothpastes.Be sure to brush the tongue as well as the teeth. Plaque on the tongue can cause bad breath. Also, since you can actually harm your gums by brushing too hard or in the wrong direction, consult your dentist on the best brushing procedures.
FLOSSINGDaily flossing is the best way to prevent gum disease between teeth. The purpose is to scrape off the plaque that forms between the teeth and just under the gum line.The various types of dental floss (waxed, unwaxed, extra fine, flossing tape and flossing ribbons) each have advantages. Select the type that works best on your teeth.The most important aspect of flossing is to curve the floss around the tooth being cleaned and slide it under the gum line. With both fingers holding the floss against the tooth, move the floss up and down several times to scrape off the plaque.Flossing should be started with children as soon as they have teeth that touch each other. A child usually can’t floss their own teeth until around the age of 8. Using a flossing tool can be helpful in doing a good job in a small mouth.
DISCLOSING TABLETSDisclosing tablets are small, chewable tablets that can be found at most drugstores. Chew the tablet and swish with water. The tablet will color any plaque that remains on the teeth. By using a flashlight and dental mirror, you can see where you’ve been missing the plaque with your regular brushing and flossing routines. This is especially helpful (and fun) for children in reinforcing good dental habits.FLUORIDEFluoride is a mineral found in most food and water supplies that strengthens tooth enamel and lowers the risk of tooth decay. In many areas of the country, fluoride is added to the water because the natural levels of fluoride are too low to protect teeth.Infants and children in low-fluoride areas can be given fluoride supplements in the form of tablets or drops. Fluoride toothpastes, rinses or topical applications are also beneficial.
SEALANTSSealants are a plastic coating usually applied to children’s back teeth. They protect the molars (the larger chewing teeth at the back of the mouth) from developing decay. By using sealants and fluoride, it is possible for children to grow up without cavities.What you can do If you have a toothache, taking aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen (Tylenol) may lessen the pain while a dental appointment is being made. NEVER give aspirin to children/teenagers. It can cause Reye’s syndrome, a rare but often fatal condition.Final notes Do not put infants or young children to bed with a bottle filled with juice,     sugar water, milk or formula. These liquids pool around teeth and can cause serious tooth decay called bottle mouth.*68\303\2*

HOW BDD AFFECTS LIVES – SOCIAL CONCEQUENCES – OTHER PROBLEMS: BRIGHT LIGHTS AND LEISURE ACTIVITIES

Harry rarely went to movies, and when he did he tried to avoid being seen. “I always sit in the back row so people can’t sit behind me and laugh at the shape of my head,” he told me. Curt walked behind people and sat in the back of the class so no one could see the slight hair thinning on the back of his head. He also always waited for an empty elevator. Jesse avoided dancing, which he loved, because he thought everyone would laugh at his supposedly bowed legs.
Many people, especially those concerned about facial defects, avoid bright lights, which could illuminate the perceived defect. “At parties, I’m very uncomfortable hanging out in the kitchen with bright lights,” a 26-year-old computer programmer told me. “I prefer a darker room.” Others avoid restaurants with bright lighting, or find a dark booth in the back, so they can’t be seen. Some people quit their jobs, or never accept one in the first place, if they have to work under fluorescent lights. In BDD-treatment groups I ran, the group members tried to avoid sitting next to the window, because they feared their defects would be more visible in brighter light. Several men have told me that they know everything about lighting. As one said, “I’m an expert on lights. I’d be a darn good lighting salesman!” will be more exposed—large hips or thighs, small breasts, small body build, thinning hair, skin defects, or cellulite. In addition, wind and water can easily ruin camouflage and painstaking grooming: makeup runs, bronzers streak, and hair styles are destroyed.
Some people avoid the things they love most. Greg avoided sports, even though he’d been an excellent athlete and had played on several varsity teams in high school. Although he was muscular and in excellent physical shape, he feared that people would see his “small and puny” body build, and stopped playing altogether. Loni didn’t play on her high school field hockey team because it would mess up her hair. “I missed a very important thing,” she told me. “I loved playing team sports—it was what I liked best of all in high school.”
*129\204\8*

HOW BDD AFFECTS LIVES – SOCIAL CONCEQUENCES – OTHER PROBLEMS: BRIGHT LIGHTS AND LEISURE ACTIVITIESHarry rarely went to movies, and when he did he tried to avoid being seen. “I always sit in the back row so people can’t sit behind me and laugh at the shape of my head,” he told me. Curt walked behind people and sat in the back of the class so no one could see the slight hair thinning on the back of his head. He also always waited for an empty elevator. Jesse avoided dancing, which he loved, because he thought everyone would laugh at his supposedly bowed legs.Many people, especially those concerned about facial defects, avoid bright lights, which could illuminate the perceived defect. “At parties, I’m very uncomfortable hanging out in the kitchen with bright lights,” a 26-year-old computer programmer told me. “I prefer a darker room.” Others avoid restaurants with bright lighting, or find a dark booth in the back, so they can’t be seen. Some people quit their jobs, or never accept one in the first place, if they have to work under fluorescent lights. In BDD-treatment groups I ran, the group members tried to avoid sitting next to the window, because they feared their defects would be more visible in brighter light. Several men have told me that they know everything about lighting. As one said, “I’m an expert on lights. I’d be a darn good lighting salesman!” will be more exposed—large hips or thighs, small breasts, small body build, thinning hair, skin defects, or cellulite. In addition, wind and water can easily ruin camouflage and painstaking grooming: makeup runs, bronzers streak, and hair styles are destroyed.Some people avoid the things they love most. Greg avoided sports, even though he’d been an excellent athlete and had played on several varsity teams in high school. Although he was muscular and in excellent physical shape, he feared that people would see his “small and puny” body build, and stopped playing altogether. Loni didn’t play on her high school field hockey team because it would mess up her hair. “I missed a very important thing,” she told me. “I loved playing team sports—it was what I liked best of all in high school.”*129\204\8*

HOW TO ASCERTAIN ASTHMA: THE DIAGNOSTIC TESTS – BREATH TESTS OR LUNG FUNCTION TESTS

Breathing tests measure lung capacity or lung volume, and the rate of air flow. During a breathing test, the child breathes into a closed tube connected to a machine that measures how fast and how much air is expelled from the lungs in a single breath. These machines determine the amount of air the lung can hold (lung volume) and the speed at which air can be exhaled out of the airway or bronchial tubes.
Spirometry. Spirometry refers to measuring the air capacity of the lungs with the help of inexpensive instruments called Spirometers. It is particularly useful in the follow-up management of an asthmatic child. It is well known that history and physical examination alone do not provide enough information to manage asthma without some additional information to assess lung function. Spirometric devices are used to help in the diagnosis and to evaluate the response to therapy. During acute episodes of asthma, spirometric measurements indicate the severity of an attack, and allow the doctor to assess the success of the treatment in managing the attack.
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HOW TO ASCERTAIN ASTHMA: THE DIAGNOSTIC TESTS – BREATH TESTS OR LUNG FUNCTION TESTSBreathing tests measure lung capacity or lung volume, and the rate of air flow. During a breathing test, the child breathes into a closed tube connected to a machine that measures how fast and how much air is expelled from the lungs in a single breath. These machines determine the amount of air the lung can hold (lung volume) and the speed at which air can be exhaled out of the airway or bronchial tubes.Spirometry. Spirometry refers to measuring the air capacity of the lungs with the help of inexpensive instruments called Spirometers. It is particularly useful in the follow-up management of an asthmatic child. It is well known that history and physical examination alone do not provide enough information to manage asthma without some additional information to assess lung function. Spirometric devices are used to help in the diagnosis and to evaluate the response to therapy. During acute episodes of asthma, spirometric measurements indicate the severity of an attack, and allow the doctor to assess the success of the treatment in managing the attack.*53\260\8*

WHAT DOES TOO MUCH INSULIN MEAN?

Assume you eat a carbohydrate-rich meal, perhaps a simple one of two slices of pizza and a bottle of cola. If you’re a normal person, four or five hours will pass before you become hungry again. If you’re a carbohydrate addict, however, you might feel hungry only two hours later—with a craving for more sweets or starchy foods (because of the excess insulin released into the bloodstream). Some carbohydrate addicts report that they feel hungry immediately after eating carbohydrates. They never feel satisfied.
Carbohydrate addicts recognize the desire to eat isn’t logical, because they know they’re not really hungry in the sense of requiring nourishment. But the drive to eat is hard to deny. You may find yourself eating out of habit, almost unconsciously satisfying a compulsion. You may snack, realizing to your surprise that you are eating out of boredom or to relieve stress. Simple fatigue may provoke hunger, too. Sometimes the desire to eat can be overwhelming, virtually compelling you to satisfy it. Sometimes you may be unable to identify any apparent cause.
Many carbohydrate addicts report that their cravings grow stronger each time they eat carbohydrates. In short order, they find themselves in a continuous cycle of eating, craving, and eating again.
For carbohydrate addicts, consuming carbohydrate-rich foods produces a compulsion to eat. At first the consumption of high-carbohydrate snacks or meals produces a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction. Shortly, however, pleasure is followed by an anxious sensation, perhaps a feeling of weakness. Hunger, tiredness, and a desire to snack often follow.
Unfortunately, the problem doesn’t end there. In the presence of the excess insulin, the body also becomes very good at conserving energy. So while the carbohydrate addict gets hungrier with each carbohydrate-rich meal, the body gets better at storing energy—in the form of fat.
When we talk to our professional colleagues, we use terminology such as “mesolimbic dopamine system” and “decreased cellular insulin receptors.” Yet the bottom line can be stated quite simply: In carbohydrate addiction, the carbohydrate-insulin/carbohydrate-serotonin connection has gone awry.
While other research scientists have reported this phenomenon, we were the first to recognize how the mechanism could be “corrected,” and the experience of hunger cravings and fat storage could be minimized. We acted on these discoveries and created the Carbohydrate Addict’s Diet.
In the past, diet experts have failed to treat the problem—whether they knew it by these names or others—by reducing the total daily intake of carbohydrates and distributing carbohydrates equally to all meals. We know that these strategies don’t work for carbohydrate addicts.
Between 95 and 98 percent of the people on standard weight-loss diets regain all lost weight within one year. Until now, no one has found any alternative to these nearly sure-to-fail treatments. Through our research we discovered that it isn’t only the amount of carbohydrates eaten that matters—it is also how frequently they are eaten. Frequency governs, in large measure, the hunger response for millions of people. Personally and professionally, we discovered that any weight-loss diet that prescribes three or more small meals each day containing anything more than minor amounts of carbohydrates will ultimately fail with the carbohydrate addict. Such a diet will trigger the insulin response and signal the carbohydrate addict to eat once again.
In general, we direct our dieters to eat two low-carbohydrate meals each day and to confine their carbohydrate-rich foods to one, daily sixty-minute sitting that makes up the third meal. In this way, the fundamental mechanism causing excessive hunger, recurring cravings, and weight gain is corrected. Insulin release is dramatically reduced. The carbohydrate addict feels satisfied—and stays satisfied for many hours. Weight drops off naturally, fat deposits decrease, and the addictive cycle is broken.
*5\236\2*

WHAT DOES TOO MUCH INSULIN MEAN?Assume you eat a carbohydrate-rich meal, perhaps a simple one of two slices of pizza and a bottle of cola. If you’re a normal person, four or five hours will pass before you become hungry again. If you’re a carbohydrate addict, however, you might feel hungry only two hours later—with a craving for more sweets or starchy foods (because of the excess insulin released into the bloodstream). Some carbohydrate addicts report that they feel hungry immediately after eating carbohydrates. They never feel satisfied.Carbohydrate addicts recognize the desire to eat isn’t logical, because they know they’re not really hungry in the sense of requiring nourishment. But the drive to eat is hard to deny. You may find yourself eating out of habit, almost unconsciously satisfying a compulsion. You may snack, realizing to your surprise that you are eating out of boredom or to relieve stress. Simple fatigue may provoke hunger, too. Sometimes the desire to eat can be overwhelming, virtually compelling you to satisfy it. Sometimes you may be unable to identify any apparent cause.Many carbohydrate addicts report that their cravings grow stronger each time they eat carbohydrates. In short order, they find themselves in a continuous cycle of eating, craving, and eating again.For carbohydrate addicts, consuming carbohydrate-rich foods produces a compulsion to eat. At first the consumption of high-carbohydrate snacks or meals produces a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction. Shortly, however, pleasure is followed by an anxious sensation, perhaps a feeling of weakness. Hunger, tiredness, and a desire to snack often follow.Unfortunately, the problem doesn’t end there. In the presence of the excess insulin, the body also becomes very good at conserving energy. So while the carbohydrate addict gets hungrier with each carbohydrate-rich meal, the body gets better at storing energy—in the form of fat.When we talk to our professional colleagues, we use terminology such as “mesolimbic dopamine system” and “decreased cellular insulin receptors.” Yet the bottom line can be stated quite simply: In carbohydrate addiction, the carbohydrate-insulin/carbohydrate-serotonin connection has gone awry.While other research scientists have reported this phenomenon, we were the first to recognize how the mechanism could be “corrected,” and the experience of hunger cravings and fat storage could be minimized. We acted on these discoveries and created the Carbohydrate Addict’s Diet.In the past, diet experts have failed to treat the problem—whether they knew it by these names or others—by reducing the total daily intake of carbohydrates and distributing carbohydrates equally to all meals. We know that these strategies don’t work for carbohydrate addicts.Between 95 and 98 percent of the people on standard weight-loss diets regain all lost weight within one year. Until now, no one has found any alternative to these nearly sure-to-fail treatments. Through our research we discovered that it isn’t only the amount of carbohydrates eaten that matters—it is also how frequently they are eaten. Frequency governs, in large measure, the hunger response for millions of people. Personally and professionally, we discovered that any weight-loss diet that prescribes three or more small meals each day containing anything more than minor amounts of carbohydrates will ultimately fail with the carbohydrate addict. Such a diet will trigger the insulin response and signal the carbohydrate addict to eat once again.In general, we direct our dieters to eat two low-carbohydrate meals each day and to confine their carbohydrate-rich foods to one, daily sixty-minute sitting that makes up the third meal. In this way, the fundamental mechanism causing excessive hunger, recurring cravings, and weight gain is corrected. Insulin release is dramatically reduced. The carbohydrate addict feels satisfied—and stays satisfied for many hours. Weight drops off naturally, fat deposits decrease, and the addictive cycle is broken.*5\236\2*

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