Archive for February 22nd, 2011

DISPARITY IN CVD (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE) RISKS

Cardiovascular disease is not an “equal opportunity” disease. In fact, when it comes to risk of attack and eventual mortality, there are huge disparities based on gender, race, and age. Consider the following:
- Higher CVD risks exist among black and Mexican American women than among white women of comparable socioeconomic status (SES). The striking differences by both ethnicity and SES underscore the critical need to improve screening, early detection, and treatment of CVD-related conditions for black and Mexican American women, as well as for women of lower SES in all ethnic groups.
- Among American Indians/Alaskan Natives age 18 and older, 63.7 percent of men and 61.4 percent of women have one or more CVD risk factors (hypertension, current cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, obesity, or diabetes). If data on physical activity had been included in this analysis, the prevalence of risk factors would have been much higher.
- In 1999, CHD death rates were 225.4 for white males and 216.4 for black males (7% higher) at all ages and stages of life.
- In 1999, CHD death rates for white females were 135.0 for white females and 154.7 for black females.
- Blacks are 60 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than are whites, and are two and a half times more likely to die of a stroke than are whites.
- A family history of diabetes, gout, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol increases one’s risk of heart disease. Blacks have an increased risk of these familial risk factors, increasing their overall risk for CVD.
*17/277/5*

DISPARITY IN CVD (CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE) RISKSCardiovascular disease is not an “equal opportunity” disease. In fact, when it comes to risk of attack and eventual mortality, there are huge disparities based on gender, race, and age. Consider the following:- Higher CVD risks exist among black and Mexican American women than among white women of comparable socioeconomic status (SES). The striking differences by both ethnicity and SES underscore the critical need to improve screening, early detection, and treatment of CVD-related conditions for black and Mexican American women, as well as for women of lower SES in all ethnic groups.- Among American Indians/Alaskan Natives age 18 and older, 63.7 percent of men and 61.4 percent of women have one or more CVD risk factors (hypertension, current cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, obesity, or diabetes). If data on physical activity had been included in this analysis, the prevalence of risk factors would have been much higher.- In 1999, CHD death rates were 225.4 for white males and 216.4 for black males (7% higher) at all ages and stages of life.- In 1999, CHD death rates for white females were 135.0 for white females and 154.7 for black females.- Blacks are 60 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than are whites, and are two and a half times more likely to die of a stroke than are whites.- A family history of diabetes, gout, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol increases one’s risk of heart disease. Blacks have an increased risk of these familial risk factors, increasing their overall risk for CVD.*17/277/5*